Which Cars Are Exempt From Congestion Charge?

There are some cars that are exempt from the congestion charge in London, and you might be surprised to know which ones they are. The congestion charge does not apply to cars with a zero emissions badge, including electric and hydrogen-powered vehicles. There are also some vehicles that are exempt from the congestion charge if they’re driving in a convoy of up to 10 cars.

This exemption is for trucks carrying goods within Greater London, and it’s only valid during daytime hours. There are some other exemptions that you might be interested in, such as heavy goods vehicles, buses and taxis. If you’re not sure whether your car is exempt from the congestion charge or not, it’s best to check with Transport for London before driving into the city.

Travel information

– The congestion charge will apply to cars that are not registered in the London region and are driven within the M25 or M1/M6 motorways.

– Cars registered outside of the M25 and M1/M6 motor

– Electric vehicles classified as zero emissions

– Hydrogen powered vehicles

– Vehicles travelling in a convoy of up to 10 cars

– Buses, taxis and trucks carrying goods within Greater London

London road user charging

If you’re travelling in the London area, you’ll need to be aware of road user charging. This is a new system that was introduced in October 2018 and will charge drivers based on how much they use the roads. There are three levels of charges, with AED 100 being charged for every kilometer travelled above 50 kilometers per hour. The rates will increase as the speed limit decreases and there’s a surcharge for heavy vehicles.

If you’re travelling in a car that isn’t registered in London, you’ll be subject to the congestion charge. This is a fee that will apply to all vehicles regardless of how efficiently they use the road. The congestion charge applies to cars with or without emissions and it’s payable by drivers using the M25 and M1/M6 motorways. If your vehicle is exempt from the fee, such as electric or hydrogen-powered cars, you won’t be charged.

If you’re travelling in a convoy of up to 10 cars, you’ll only be subject to the fee if there are at least five registered vehicles. Buses and taxis travelling within Greater London are exempt from road user charging, as are heavy goods vehicles and trucks carrying goods within London.

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Discounts

Motorcycles, emergency vehicles and buses have exemptions from the congestion charge.

Motorcycle riders can use any vehicle free of charge for 12 months if they register with Transport for London.  They must be registered by January 1 each year. Motorcyclists travelling in a convoy must have at least two registered vehicles.

Documents you need to provide

which cars are exempt from congestion charge

If you’re travelling in a car registered in London, you’ll need to provide your driving licence and UK registration number. If the vehicle is not registered in London, you’ll need to provide proof of ownership such as a bill of sale or registration certificate.

If you’re travelling on public transport, you’ll need to show your ticket and passport or national identity card.

Cost

The cost of a single journey is £4.50 for the first 7 days, and then £1.50 per day thereafter. There are no discounts or exemptions for Blue Badge holders. Blue Badge Holders can purchase single trips within London for £1.50 each.

Renewing your Blue Badge discount

If you’re eligible for a discount on your congestion charge, you need to renew your Blue Badge every year. To do this, go to: https://tfl.gov.uk/modes/driving/congestion-charge

Applying for Blue Badge discount on behalf of someone else

If you’re travelling on behalf of someone else, you need to provide proof of their identity and ownership of the vehicle. This can be a copy of their driver licence or passport, or written confirmation from the person in charge of the vehicle.

Congestion Charge navigation

If you’re travelling in central London, use the congestion charge map to help find an efficient route.

Are there any other exemptions to congestion charge in London that I should know about?

Yes! There are a few other exemptions to congestion charge that you should be aware of. These include motorcycles, buses, and bicycles. Motorcycles are exempt from the congestion charge if they are registered and carry a valid motorcycle registration certificate. Buses are exempt if they are carrying passengers for hire, and bicycles are exempt if they are carrying no more than three people and are not ridden in a bus lane or in a bus stop.

What does the exemption mean for me if I own one of these cars?

If you own a car that is registered and carry a valid motorcycle registration certificate, or if your bicycle is not ridden in a bus lane or bus stop, you can still pay the congestion charge.

Is there a list of all the vehicles that are exempt from congestion charge?

The list of vehicles that are exempt from congestion charge can change depending on the time of year. However, some of the most common exemptions include buses, motorcycles, bicycles, and emergency vehicles.

Low emission zone

The low emission zone is an emissions-based tax zone that was introduced in London on 27 October 2017. All vehicles entering the low emission zone must pay a £12 congestion charge, and if they are older than 10 years old, they also need to purchase one of the following exemptions:

1. Class A exempt vehicles (they have been preproduced before 1 November 1997)

2. Exempted or zero-emissions exempt vehicles with BYD e6 car

3. Low emissions vehicle (LOV) registered before 1 November 2017

4. Vehicles with an eco certificate or credit for low emission vehicles

Emissions standard

If you need to pay the full congestion charge, make sure your emissions standard is more than those required by Ulez. The emissions standard required by Ulez is Euro 6, which means your car must have a valid EU6 certificate and meet all the requirements of the standard.

Conclusion

Congestion charge is a fee that London drivers have to pay for driving in the city between 7 am and 6 pm on weekdays. The fee is £10 for the first 10 km, then £5 for every kilometer thereafter. The fee applies to cars with a maximum speed of less than 40 km/h, and buses, motorcycles, and bicycles are exempt. In this blog, we have listed all the cars that are exempt from the congestion charge.

So, if you are driving a car that is not on this list and you are caught by the police driving in the city during those hours, you will be liable to pay the congestion charge. Keep this information handy so that you don’t get caught by the authorities!

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